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Sister Diane Young

<p class="font_7">Sister Diane Young lives in the Sierra Madre Mountains in the town of Tlacoachistlahuaca, about a 45 minute drive from Ometepec, Mexico.&nbsp; In 1986 Sister Diane went on vacation to visit the priest there.&nbsp; Noticing a great need, Diane made the decision to move there.&nbsp; In 1994 Dr. Thomas Steinemann, a physician at the Hospital de la Amistad, asked Diane if she would translate for Dr. Jerre Freeman and his eye teams.&nbsp; She has been assisting our teams ever since.<br>
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Sister Diane and Fidel, an Amuzgo Indian Chief, keep an eye out for prospective patients through the year and bring them down for screening when our teams arrive in Ometepec.&nbsp; They bring Amuzgos and Mixtecos and sometimes others who have a dialect no one understands.&nbsp; It takes twice as long to screen the Amuzgos and Mixtecos because they need two translators.&nbsp; Amuzgo women are easily recognized by their hairstyle.&nbsp; They grow their hair really long, twist and twist it, then wrap it on top of their heads.&nbsp; The Mixteco women wear their hair braided.&nbsp; Amuzgo and Mixteco women wear beautiful hand woven cotton dresses with colorful thread intricately incorporated by talented weavers.&nbsp; Amuzgo men wear a white hat and white clothes while the Mixteco men wear more western clothes.<br>
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Up until the last two years Sister Diane worked in a boarding school for children.&nbsp; The children live in surrounding villages but live in the boarding school during the week so they can attend school, eat and study.&nbsp; She is semi retired now and spends some of the year in California with family.&nbsp; While in Mexico she spends her time ministering to the sick in Tlacoachistlahuaca and surrounding villages.&nbsp; Sister Diane believes, “Our lives are always the plan of God.”</p>

Sister Diane Young

<p class="font_7">Sister Diane Young lives in the Sierra Madre Mountains in the town of Tlacoachistlahuaca, about a 45 minute drive from Ometepec, Mexico.&nbsp; In 1986 Sister Diane went on vacation to visit the priest there.&nbsp; Noticing a great need, Diane made the decision to move there.&nbsp; In 1994 Dr. Thomas Steinemann, a physician at the Hospital de la Amistad, asked Diane if she would translate for Dr. Jerre Freeman and his eye teams.&nbsp; She has been assisting our teams ever since.<br>
<br>
Sister Diane and Fidel, an Amuzgo Indian Chief, keep an eye out for prospective patients through the year and bring them down for screening when our teams arrive in Ometepec.&nbsp; They bring Amuzgos and Mixtecos and sometimes others who have a dialect no one understands.&nbsp; It takes twice as long to screen the Amuzgos and Mixtecos because they need two translators.&nbsp; Amuzgo women are easily recognized by their hairstyle.&nbsp; They grow their hair really long, twist and twist it, then wrap it on top of their heads.&nbsp; The Mixteco women wear their hair braided.&nbsp; Amuzgo and Mixteco women wear beautiful hand woven cotton dresses with colorful thread intricately incorporated by talented weavers.&nbsp; Amuzgo men wear a white hat and white clothes while the Mixteco men wear more western clothes.<br>
<br>
Up until the last two years Sister Diane worked in a boarding school for children.&nbsp; The children live in surrounding villages but live in the boarding school during the week so they can attend school, eat and study.&nbsp; She is semi retired now and spends some of the year in California with family.&nbsp; While in Mexico she spends her time ministering to the sick in Tlacoachistlahuaca and surrounding villages.&nbsp; Sister Diane believes, “Our lives are always the plan of God.”</p>